All posts by Katherine Becvar

Gretchen Keer and Jeffra Bussmann – Transforming Knowledge Production: Decolonizing Information Literacy – notes

A really interesting presentation on bringing more of a focus on social justice into information literacy coursework, by incorporating what the presenters call “research justice.”  This involves looking at the sometimes problematic and exploitative process by which academic research gets done, and contrasting it with themes of community engagement and participatory action research (sometimes also called community-based participatory research), which involves research participants in all parts of the research – developing research questions, collecting data, and disseminating the findings in both academic venues and ways that the community can benefit from the research being done.  A really interesting topic, and one which I was delighted to see covered — I plan on touching on these themes for my own instruction.  Well done Gretchen and Jeffra!

Continue reading Gretchen Keer and Jeffra Bussmann – Transforming Knowledge Production: Decolonizing Information Literacy – notes

Marie Kennedy – “An intentional conversation: Electronic resources and your library patrons” – notes

Marie Kennedy’s invited paper session covered library marketing, which is a topic that I was delighted to see covered.  She focused primarily on the first part of the ‘marketing cycle’, which is to hone in on and learn more about your target market before undergoing a marketing plan, in order to find out more about them – how to reach them, and what messages will make the most impact.  Read on for more detailed notes:

Continue reading Marie Kennedy – “An intentional conversation: Electronic resources and your library patrons” – notes

“Letting User Search Behavior Lead Us: An Analysis of Search Queries & Relevancy in USC’s Web-Scale Discovery Tool” – Beth Namei and Christal Young – notes from the session

This session presented out on findings from research done on USC’s recent implementation of the discovery layer Summon.  The presenters did a review based on relevance of returned results for a smaller sub-set of searches, and compared them to both Google and Google Scholar.  Some really unexpected findings, and some really great strategies for transforming the iffy performance of our tools into new approaches for teaching information literacy in our organizations.  Read on!

Continue reading “Letting User Search Behavior Lead Us: An Analysis of Search Queries & Relevancy in USC’s Web-Scale Discovery Tool” – Beth Namei and Christal Young – notes from the session

“Ethnographic Study of Student Research Frustrations” – notes

The session titled “An Ethnographic Study of Student Research Frustrations” appealed to me because I trained as an ethnographer while studying my subject specialization in grad school.  The presenters in this session had some really interesting qualitative findings that expanded way beyond their original research question, which demonstrates some of the benefits of qualitative research (you get more than you bargained for!).  In particular, I found the different methods that they used (‘map of the day’, text message brief interviews, photo journals) to each be really innovative methods for gathering research data in a minimally-intrusive way for research participants.  Keep reading for my detailed notes.  Good stuff!

Continue reading “Ethnographic Study of Student Research Frustrations” – notes

Michele Van Hoeck – “The Social Side of Research” – notes

I’m posting the notes I took during Michele Van Hoeck’s session on “The Social Side of Research”, which is a focus on a specific aspect of the findings from a Project Information Literacy study which explored the information needs and gaps in information literacy which recent graduates encountered when they joined the workforce.  Michele presented on a related topic at the CCLI conference in 2013, but I was pleased that she expanded on one of the findings that I found to be most interesting — namely, that information needs in the workplace encompass a social and iterative quality that isn’t really found in college assignments.  Read on for more details: Continue reading Michele Van Hoeck – “The Social Side of Research” – notes

Patty Iannuzzi’s Keynote – Leadership in Action: Leading, Learning, and Reflecting on a Career in Academic Libraries – notes

Here are my notes from Patricia Iannuzzi’s keynote speech about her experience with leadership in a variety of academic library organizations.  She related some key formative experiences, primarily from the perspective of how leadership intersects with management roles.

Continue reading Patty Iannuzzi’s Keynote – Leadership in Action: Leading, Learning, and Reflecting on a Career in Academic Libraries – notes